Sunday, November 18, 2007

Nuclear Safety in Pakistan - Latest Publications

Click: Outlook: Another Haven in Pakistan
Musharraf Protects King of Nuclear Proliferation -- And Bush Is Fine With That
Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins: Authors, "The Nuclear Jihadist"
Monday, November 12, 2007; 2:00 PM

Washington: Dr. Qadeer Khan, his movements and day-to-day activities within and abroad were guarded heavily and protected by the Pakistan army, including Musharraf; why is only Dr. Khan held responsible for any nuclear proliferation, and not Pakistani army generals, including Musharraf?

Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins: There is no conclusive evidence that any Pakistani military or political leaders knew of Khan's nuclear trafficking. That said, there is substantial circumstantial evidence that at least some of them knew at least the broad outlines of what he was up to at least as far back as 1987, when he first started dealing with the Iranians. The most compelling case for Pakistani leaders knowing what Khan did involves North Korea.

Trust Us
So, What About Those Nukes?
By DAVID E. SANGER: NYT, November 11, 2007

TWO years ago, when Gen. Pervez Musharraf still seemed secure in his rule over Pakistan, he was asked a question that is now urgently coursing through Washington: Are his country’s nuclear weapons safe from Islamic radicals?

Pakistan’s nuclear protections “are already the best in the world,” he said then, in an interview. He launched into a detailed description of the controls he had put in place. Chief among them was that only a small group of top officials — General Musharraf and men he trusts — hold the keys to moving or using a weapon.

He also talked about new physical controls over Pakistan’s many nuclear facilities, including the laboratories that were once the playground of Abdul Qadeer Khan, the national hero who established Pakistan as the hub of the biggest proliferation network in nuclear history. The leaking of much of the technology to Iran, North Korea and Libya, starting in the late 1980s, often coincided with times of political turmoil when Pakistan’s leadership was weak and its attention elsewhere.

For Complete Text, click here

Also See:
U.S. helps Pakistan protect nuclear arms: report Reuters

"Pakistan's Political Unrest Prompts Questions About Nuclear Arsenal"
Media Interview Transcript: Newshour with Jim Lehrer - November 13, 2007

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